Instructional Course Lectures

Instructional Courses are included in standard registration fees and are daily concurrent sessions. Brief descriptions are posted here click to view  full descriptions with faculty listed.

CME Available

The ASSH designates the live Instructional Courses on Thursday and Friday for a maximum of 1.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The ASSH designates the live Instructional Courses on Saturday for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Thursday Instructional Courses Friday Instructional Courses Saturday Instructional Courses
4:45 PM to 6:00 PM
Room 2001, Convention Center
This session will cover evaluation of the unhappy patient, identification of suitable candidates for additional intervention and discuss medico-legal issues that may arise during care.  The faculty will explain and discuss common and serious complications including fixation failure and explain strategies for management of tendon rupture, infection, nonunion, failure of fixation and late collapse after fixation.
4:45 PM to 6:00 PM
Room 3020, Convention Center
Elbow instability involving ligament and bony injuries can be challenging to evaluate and treat. This instructional course will present tips and techniques for assessment and treatment of elbow trauma instability.
4:45 PM to 6:00 PM
Room 2022, Convention Center
We will address 3 topics for consideration to further the objective of building a high performing team: Assembling, Optimizing, and Remediating.
4:45 PM to 6:00 PM
Room 2016, Convention Center
 We will compare and contrast the clinical features, diagnostic findings and treatment principles for the following mimickers; gout, pseudogout, acute calcific periarthritis, osteoarthritis flare, pyogenic granuloma, pyoderma gangrenosum, spider bites, paraneoplastic syndromes, factitious disorders, granuloma annulare, chemical burn, herpetic whitlow, and acrometastases.  
4:45 PM to 6:00 PM
Room 3016, Convention Center
Upper extremity nerve injuries are common, yet they are often associated with post-surgical problems that are challenging for both patient and physician. This panel will discuss the best management techniques for the complications associated with peripheral nerve repair. Perhaps the worst outcome of nerve surgery is the completely failed repair.
4:45 PM to 6:00 PM
Room 2014, Convention Center
Although not yet widely adopted, ultrasound has been increasingly used in the diagnostic workup of carpal and cubital tunnel syndrome. This instructional course is designed to demystify the use of ultrasound though a number of short lectures. The audience will learn how ultrasonography of the median and the ulnar nerve is performed and will learn the critical aspects of the examination that distinguish affected and unaffected individuals.
4:45 PM to 6:00 PM
Room 2006, Convention Center
The current management following upper extremity nerve injury is a changing paradigm. Motor recovery following nerve injury can be less than optimal resulting in impaired muscle function and long term disability. Nerve transfers provide a direct source of motor innervation at a site distal to the injury and closer to the motor end plates and faster recovery and thus maximizing patient outcome.
4:45 PM to 6:00 PM
Room 3022, Convention Center

In 2016, surgeon investigators are required to conduct increasingly rigorous research to compete for publication and extramural funding. Therefore, the ASSH’s Clinical Research and Grantsmanship Committee has designed this instructional course to teach the fundamentals of communicating research findings.

4:45 PM to 6:00 PM
Room 3024, Convention Center
This ICL will focus on the use of scientific evidence as a basis for rendering expert opinion and testimony using Carpal Tunnel Syndrome as an example.
4:45 PM to 6:00 PM
Room 2009, Convention Center
This course will focus on the prevention, recognition and treatment of malunions following pediatric hand, wrist, forearm, and elbow fractures.  Treatment strategies for the malunions will be presented as well as ways to avoid their occurrence.  Teaching methods will include illustrative cases.  
4:45 PM to 6:00 PM
Room 2003, Convention Center
Patient diversity is more prevalent today. Recognizing patient diversity with both compassion and understanding is crucial.  It is imperative not only to recognize how patients' cultural differences necessitate different approaches to care, but to gain insight into carrying out patient care.
4:45 PM to 6:00 PM
Room 3014, Convention Center
As reimbursements decline and overhead costs continue to rise, physicians, especially those inprivate practice, are finding it more difficult to maintain an operating margin that allows them tocontinue to deliver quality care to patients while maintaining their desired standard of living.Many models solve this by increasing patient volume, which either means increased hours spentin office or less time spent with patients.
4:45 PM to 6:00 PM
Room 2007, Convention Center
Mandated reporting of quality measures to Medicare and private payers continues to increase,and affect reimbursement.  This ICL focuses on practical tips to keep your practice compliant inthe current system, as well as practical strategies to stay compliant in future value-basedpayment systems.  The information will be pertinent to the hand surgeon in a small privatepractice as well as a large health system.  
4:45 PM to 6:00 PM
Room 2024, Convention Center

The “Opioid Epidemic” is a growing problem nationwide problem. Currently, the USA represents 5% of the world’s population, but consumes 80% of the world’s opioids. The problem is multifactorial but includes issues such as patients’ pain management expectation, opioid potency and dependence, and physician prescribing habits.

4:45 PM to 6:00 PM
Room 2005, Convention Center
Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plans (SCAMPs) are innovative tools to drive adaptive quality care improvement. They have been shown to engage front-line clinicians in quality work, to standardize care through pathways, to improve quality and to reduce unnecessary utilization. SCAMPs works by creating a flexible and dynamic pathway for patient care of a particular condition, which allows for deviation and iterative modification based on collected and analyzed data
4:45 PM to 6:00 PM
Room 3018, Convention Center
Clinical volume and indications for replantation surgery vary widely internationally. This course reviews these recent trends and techniques in upper extremity replantation. Participants will review basic replantation strategies by level of amputation, surgical outcomes, and gain introduction to advanced topics including free tissue transfer and allotransplantation for secondary reconstruction.  
4:45 PM to 6:00 PM
Room 3001/3003, Convention Center
What really works: The best and worst results from the experts and how to avoid their mistakes. Despite 3 decades of research and treatment, there remains no standard to diagnosis or manage scapholunate injury.  This course will ask world authorities in wrist instability to provide there algorithm and techniques for diagnosis and treatment of SL instability. 
4:45 PM to 6:00 PM
Room 2020, Convention Center
Patients no longer need to be immobilized for 4 weeks after extensor tendon repair over the metacarpals. Relative motion extension splints applied 3-7 days after the surgery will permit many compliant patients to return to work with only a minimal risk of rupture. Surgeons will be able to repair old subluxated mallets in a simple fashion, as well as perform WALANT FDS tenodesis for swan neck.
4:45 PM to 6:00 PM
Room 2018, Convention Center

Posttraumatic arthritis of the wrist can present substantial disability to the function of the upper limb. The clinical presentation may vary depending upon the underlying etiology and prior treatment. The involvement of the radoiocarpal joint can extend from an isolated articulation to extend to all the radiocarpal joint surfaces. 
4:45 PM to 6:00 PM
Room 2004, Convention Center
Conditions affecting the Proximal Interphalangeal Joint (PIPJ) of the hand are wide ranging. These common conditions, seen by all practicing hand surgeons, compose a spectrum: from the trauma sustained by a high school football player, to the post-traumatic reconstruction of such an injury that was missed, to the treatment of degenerative and inflammatory involvement of the PIP joint as we age
4:45 PM to 6:00 PM
Room 2011, Convention Center
Emergent surgical management of the mangled upper can impose difficult challenges to the novice and veteran hand surgeon.  Through years of treating battlefield injuries, U.S. military hand surgeons have utilized innovative methods to achieve limb salvage after high-energy injuries to the upper extremity.